The liberal and Catholic origins of the Belgian Constitution

A recent volume makes the case for a revision of the standing interpretation of sovereignty in the Belgian Constitution. The book is the result of a four-years’ interdisciplinary collaboration between philosophers, lawyers, historians and political scientists to establish a historically and intellectually sound reinterpretation of sovereignty, and to formulate scenarios for political renewal in Belgium.  In today’s post, historian Stefaan Marteel considers the ideas of the liberals and Catholics who opposed the government of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, in the years preceding the Belgian Revolution.

Continue reading “The liberal and Catholic origins of the Belgian Constitution”

Sovereignty in the Belgian Constitution revisited: Introduction

A recent volume makes the case for a revision of the standing interpretation of sovereignty in the Belgian Constitution. The book is the result of a four-years’ interdisciplinary collaboration between philosophers, lawyers, historians and political scientists to establish a historically and intellectually sound reinterpretation of sovereignty, and to formulate scenarios for political renewal in Belgium.  Today’s post provides an introduction to the book’s subject matter and its central arguments. In succeeding posts, contributors will elaborate on some of the main findings. Continue reading “Sovereignty in the Belgian Constitution revisited: Introduction”