We Need Human Rights, and Human Rights Need Us – The Call for Individual Action in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Seventy-two years ago today, the ‘Universal Declaration of Human Rights’ was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. To this day, this document remains our quintessential guide when it comes to human rights protection. That is why every year, on  December 10, we celebrate ‘Human Rights Day’. What is often forgotten, however, is that the Universal Declaration, aside from a list of rights, also includes a call for individual action.

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Relativity or universality: a false dichotomy that violates human rights

‘Can We Still Afford Human Rights?’ This was the provocative question asked by the four editors of the book Can We Still Afford Human Rights? Critical Reflections on Universality, Proliferation and Costs (Edward Elgar 2020). A question which several authors aim to answer in their contributions to the book. In the volume, 14 chapters focus on one of the three interlinked topics of universality, proliferation and costs. In this blog series, three posts relating to the book focus on one of these topics respectively. In this post, Nick Goetschalckx explains why the difference between relative and universal views of human rights constitutes a false dichotomy that threatens to keep focus away from the essence of human rights.

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Can we still afford human rights? Issues of universality, proliferation and costs

‘Can We Still Afford Human Rights?’ This was the provocative question asked by the four editors of the book Can We Still Afford Human Rights? Critical Reflections on Universality, Proliferation and Costs (Edward Elgar 2020). A question which several authors aim to answer in their contributions to the book. In the volume, 14 chapters focus on one of the three interlinked topics of universality, proliferation and costs. In this blog series, three posts relating to the book will focus on one of these topics respectively. In this first post, however, we draw from the book’s introduction to share the idea behind the project and the links between the three topics.

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Kunst & Recht (X): Altijd blijven lachen

‘Execution’ – Yue Minjun

In de blogreeks Kunst & Recht maakt elke blogpost de sprong van een element uit de wereld van de kunst in ruime zin naar de wereld van het recht. Vertrekkend van bijvoorbeeld een lied of een schilderij wordt de lezer geleid naar rechtspraak van het EHRM. In deze blogpost doet het kunstwerk Execution van Yue Minjun ons nadenken over persoonlijke autonomie en individuele vrijheid van Chinese burgers.

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Kunst & Recht (IX): Express Yourself – Censuur versus cultuur

“It’s crazy to see people be what society wants them to be, but not me.”

In de blogreeks Kunst & Recht maakt elke blogpost de sprong van een element uit de wereld van de kunst in ruime zin naar de wereld van het recht. Vertrekkend van bijvoorbeeld een lied of een schilderij wordt de lezer geleid naar rechtspraak van het EHRM. In deze blogpost doet het nummer Express Yourself van de Amerikaanse hiphopgroep N.W.A. ons nadenken over vrije meningsuiting en het aankaarten van politiegeweld. 

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Kunst & Recht (IV): Free South Africa

‘Free South Africa’ – Keith Haring

In de blogreeks Kunst & Recht maakt elke blogpost de sprong van een element uit de wereld van de kunst in ruime zin naar de wereld van het recht. Vertrekkend van bijvoorbeeld een lied of een schilderij wordt de lezer geleid naar rechtspraak van het EHRM. In deze blogpost doet het kunstwerk Free South Africa van Keith Haring ons nadenken over de Zuid-Afrikaanse rassendiscriminatie. 

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European Parliament Calls for a Ban on Blackface

 

For the first time in its existence, the European Parliament has taken a clear political position on the  black face practice. According to Marike Lefevre, the European Parliament’s resolution on the anti-racism protests following George Floyd’s death constitutes a push towards abolishing the practice of black painting of faces to portray a certain character. Continue reading “European Parliament Calls for a Ban on Blackface”

The protection of human rights: a noble task for courts

“Human Rights Court”, Philipp Heinisch, 2020

On Friday 22 November 2019, a celebration in honour of Paul Lemmens’ emeritus status was held, in the company of many of his friends and colleagues. For this occasion, a number of them wrote a contribution for the wonderful Liber amicorum Paul Lemmens. In a special blog series we have drawn attention to several contributions in this book. To conclude our series, we give the floor to the celebrated emeritus himself.

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The Existence of a Judicial Dialogue between the ECtHR and International Investment Arbitration?

On Friday 22 November 2019, a celebration in honour of Paul Lemmens’ emeritus status was held, in the company of many of his friends and colleagues. For this occasion, a number of them wrote a contribution for the wonderful Liber amicorum Paul Lemmens. In this blog series we draw attention to several contributions in this book. This week, dr. Charline Daelman discusses the existence and nature of a judicial dialogue between the European Court of Human Rights and international investment arbitration. Continue reading “The Existence of a Judicial Dialogue between the ECtHR and International Investment Arbitration?”