¡A.I. Caramba! – The reconciliation of AI judges with the ECHR

Artificial intelligence is rapidly being deployed in legal systems all over the world. While certain types of software offer to replace the lawyer for several relatively simple issues, others aim to help the lawyer to conduct research faster than any human ever could. Globally, AI has already proven to be a valuable ally in the distribution of justice. Consequently, it is no surprise that voices are calling to replace, or at least support, human judges with artificial intelligence. Is this the future of humanity or the start of the apocalypse? 

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Ghoumid v France: A Problematic Seal of Approval

On 25 June 2020, the Strasbourg Court delivered judgement in the case of Ghoumid and others v France. An important question in the case was whether the French administrative measure of citizenship deprivation constituted a punishment in the sense of Article 4 Protocol 7 ECHR. According to Louise Reyntjens, the Court’s conclusion is difficult to defend. Continue reading “Ghoumid v France: A Problematic Seal of Approval”

The Existence of a Judicial Dialogue between the ECtHR and International Investment Arbitration?

On Friday 22 November 2019, a celebration in honour of Paul Lemmens’ emeritus status was held, in the company of many of his friends and colleagues. For this occasion, a number of them wrote a contribution for the wonderful Liber amicorum Paul Lemmens. In this blog series we draw attention to several contributions in this book. This week, dr. Charline Daelman discusses the existence and nature of a judicial dialogue between the European Court of Human Rights and international investment arbitration. Continue reading “The Existence of a Judicial Dialogue between the ECtHR and International Investment Arbitration?”

Claiming the Convention’s ‘Duties and Responsibilities’ in the Face of Illiberalism

On Friday 22 November 2019, a celebration in honour of Paul Lemmens’ emeritus status was held, in the company of many of his friends and colleagues. For this occasion, a number of them wrote a contribution for the wonderful Liber amicorum Paul Lemmens. In this blog series we draw attention to several contributions in this book. This week, Michaël Merrigan considers the potential of ‘duties and responsibilities’ (article 10 ECHR) in the face of illiberalism.
Continue reading “Claiming the Convention’s ‘Duties and Responsibilities’ in the Face of Illiberalism”