Hot times for Ecocide (II): The Belgian proposal

Image by Eva Sevrin

Both nationally and internationally, the question is raised of whether, and if so how, large-scale environmental damage should be criminalized.  In a two-fold post, Eva Sevrin sets out the context of a Belgian proposal and discusses how it envisages ecocide as the newest international crime. In this second post, she focusses on the question of ecocide in the (Belgian) national order. Continue reading “Hot times for Ecocide (II): The Belgian proposal”

Hot times for Ecocide (I)

Image by Eva Sevrin

Questions concerning the climate and sustainability continue to stir up strong responses in society and are becoming ever more prominent on the agenda. These topics also raise important legal questions. A special blog series puts these important and wide-ranging issues in the spotlight. Two new posts hone in on the (national and international) question of whether, and if so how, large-scale environmental damage should be criminalized.  Eva Sevrin sets out the context of a Belgian proposal and discusses how it envisages ecocide as the newest international crime. In this first post, she discusses the meaning of the concept and the rise of national proposals on ecocide. In the next post, we will further scrutinize the Belgian national proposal. Continue reading “Hot times for Ecocide (I)”

From climate to nature, from ‘blah blah’ to action?

Questions concerning the climate and sustainability continue to stir up strong responses in society and are becoming ever more prominent on the agenda. These topics also raise important legal questions. A special blog series puts these important and wide-ranging issues in the spotlight. As we await whether climate commitments will be made more concrete in Glasgow, Edwin Alblas shines a light on the connection between climate and nature and shares some findings on the effectiveness of nature laws in the EU in practice. Continue reading “From climate to nature, from ‘blah blah’ to action?”